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And where it's due - A little less than a happy high
komos
komos
And where it's due
One thing that Joe made a point of leaving, noting that I was more likely to make use of it simply because I'd eventually get back to my translation, was Traité de l’Art de Faire des Armes by M. Louis-Justin la Faugère (Lyon: 1820) The book is not in the greatest of condition, thanks to the ham-handed treatment of the fold-out plates by an unnamed former owner and a desperate need for rebinding. Still, it is a nice addition to my smallish collection on the subject. I've all French masters at this point, partly due to availability and partly because I wouldn't have the first clue of how to approach early modern Italian, Spanish, or German.

Maître la Faugère is shown here in his relatively famous exhibition match against the Comte de Bondy. For what it's worth, I still haven't quite figured out how to translate espadon.
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Comments
mittenstein From: mittenstein Date: October 4th, 2005 02:54 pm (UTC) (Link)
an espadon is probably a type of sword. it's the same root as 'espada', which is just 'sword'.

a spade is a spade, y'know?
komos From: komos Date: October 4th, 2005 02:58 pm (UTC) (Link)
I had gotten that far. The trouble that I'm having is that his reference to the espadon is to a specific type of sword. The historical sources I've referenced all point to a fairly heavy broadsword, which doesn't seem appropriate in context.
mittenstein From: mittenstein Date: October 4th, 2005 03:25 pm (UTC) (Link)

?

komos From: komos Date: October 4th, 2005 03:30 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: ?

That would be the problem. Use of the great sword fell out of favor by the 1700s, and as far as I know, none but the most traditional German schools were using it by the time that this was written. Most of the French schools trended towards increasingly lighter blades, and he's discussing his studies while serving in the cavalry when he references it.
mittenstein From: mittenstein Date: October 4th, 2005 03:33 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: ?

the term may not be very well behaved. at least in spanish i can see it just becoming a generic word for 'sword'.
komos From: komos Date: October 4th, 2005 04:10 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: ?

It was referenced in the introduction where he was outlining his "lineage," and in this passage he noted the various weapons he studied with a particular maestro. Saber and epee were listed in addition to the espadon. I started thinking that it was simply a reference to a heavier, rapier-style blade (perhaps even a smallsword?), but I've not found reference in other texts to support it. Of course, I say that having fairly limited access to other texts...
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komos From: komos Date: October 5th, 2005 02:59 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: ?

It's the most common usage, but given the time period, I'd be more inclined to lean towards the cut and thrust sword. I may go so far as to drop a line to one or two of the historical armed combat experts to get their take.
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komos From: komos Date: October 4th, 2005 05:01 pm (UTC) (Link)
I'm not sure how much more geeky I can be than agonizing over a single word in translating and early 19th C. fencing manual.

They're SCA, I'm assuming? Please understand that I've no issue with SCA fencers as a rule... just the group that were constantly talking trash at the BFA (one was a maestro!) and had no concept of proper sword and cloak technique.

There's some in every crowd, really.
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komos From: komos Date: October 5th, 2005 08:00 pm (UTC) (Link)
The most contemporary source noted, Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française, 6th edition (1835), supports either the espadon as great sword theory or suggests what might be a practice saber.
prosicated From: prosicated Date: October 4th, 2005 08:48 pm (UTC) (Link)
There's a nationally ranked fencer in the new cohort in my department. I'll ask her if she knows on Friday.
komos From: komos Date: October 5th, 2005 03:01 am (UTC) (Link)
Thanks.

What's this I hear about no friends 'til Brooklyn?
prosicated From: prosicated Date: October 5th, 2005 11:35 am (UTC) (Link)
That should be revised to read "no friends 'til PhD," I am turning into one of those grad students who can't disengage -- ugh. =)
komos From: komos Date: October 5th, 2005 04:16 pm (UTC) (Link)
So does that mean a 'no' on fondue?

I'm using gruyere...
prosicated From: prosicated Date: October 5th, 2005 04:28 pm (UTC) (Link)
I"d like to practice disengaging, so as long as you don't mind some incoherence, we're on. Besides which, if I can share friends with Ry, like you, he's good at balancing out my growing oddity. =)
komos From: komos Date: October 5th, 2005 08:00 pm (UTC) (Link)
So I can plan, when are you guys free?
prosicated From: prosicated Date: October 5th, 2005 08:38 pm (UTC) (Link)
I don't know, I need to confer with Ry -- his band practice schedule's been erratic.
Email?
komos From: komos Date: October 5th, 2005 09:31 pm (UTC) (Link)
Sure thing. Jus' lemme know.
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