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I find things so much more interesting when I'm on - A little less than a happy high
komos
komos
I find things so much more interesting when I'm on
I went agin’ common wisdom and made petits choux farcis last night. To be fair to you folk, I did make some tarragon chicken salad yesterday, but it was basically just about right for a single serving and delicious enough that it didn’t make it past lunchtime. Considering that there were a couple of meals had off the bird and then there were two distinct dishes created from the remains, I think I can declare the roast a success.

Last night’s adventure was a joint effort, too. Yoon was good enough to pull the bird apart, helped keep ahead of dishes, and otherwise offered an extra set of hands whenever asked. I occasionally forget how much easier a second person can make things. For my part, I answered questions about my weird nomenclature, speculated about the universal nature of things stuffed in other things, and may have mentioned that farce derived from the French farci ("stuffed") since they were skits that were crammed in between more important parts of the play. You go with what you know.

We didn’t make soup, nor did we cook the bones down further for stock. What we did do, also against common wisdom, was heat the existing soup and cooked it good. There were no off flavors or weird textures, so right now we’re calling it a successful recovery. Yeah, it might seem a little crazy, but remember, I’m willing to go through with crafting the infamous "cock ale" before the Year of the Cock is up (which means that I need to get crackin’).

Pumpkin bread & pie and freezing tonight if I have enough time. Thursday, otherwise. After the first of the year, I’ll see if I can’t convince Joe to come over with canning stuff to make the jam.
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cris From: cris Date: December 21st, 2005 07:36 pm (UTC) (Link)
What we did do, also against common wisdom, was heat the existing soup and cooked it good. There were no off flavors or weird textures, so right now we’re calling it a successful recovery.
hah! good for you. don't fear the leftovers.

fwiw, I never make chicken salad unless I have at least half a breast to work with. Any less on a carcass is, as you say, almost not worth the trouble.

did you have pastry lying around for use as choux or did you whip that up from scratch?
komos From: komos Date: December 21st, 2005 08:26 pm (UTC) (Link)

Never fear the leftovers

I used half a breast and some thigh meat for the salad. It was pretty tasty.

I didn't go the pastry route, though my understanding of choux is based entirely around what my family used to refer to stuffed cabbage. Now I'll need to track this idea down.
cris From: cris Date: December 21st, 2005 09:41 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Never fear the leftovers

ah, fair enough. I keep on forgetting the etymology and that choux is really a french word for cabbage, and not just pastry inspired by the concept of stuffed cabbage. With my family, the only time that cabbage leaves and poultry met would be in a Peking duck.
komos From: komos Date: December 21st, 2005 09:50 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Never fear the leftovers

This is supposed to be made primarily with pork, but with the bacon and sausage, I've found that it's flavorful enough that I don't necessarily need the extra pig. One of these days, I'll do the poulet vert variant, which, near as I can tell, is a kind of meatloaf wrapped entirely in cabbage leaves.

Green chicken indeed...

Would you believe me if I said that I don't think I've ever had Peking duck?
cris From: cris Date: December 22nd, 2005 04:40 am (UTC) (Link)

Re: Never fear the leftovers

I would. It's like the Chinese cuisine equivalent of a souffle. Tasty but a pain in the ass to prepare properly (old-school Chinese restaurants will require that you order the dish a day in advance1 ). Tends to dissuade most diners from ordering it.

1 Watching Ming Tsai cut prep time down to thirty minutes with the help of an air compressor on an early episode of Iron Chef America was awesome.
starboogie From: starboogie Date: December 21st, 2005 08:35 pm (UTC) (Link)
You are the second person today to tempt me with scrumptious cabbage (Huh. "scrumptious cabbage". How often do you hear -that-?). Conspiracy! We always called 'em pigs-in-the-blanket, or "piggies" for short. Though ours, necessarily, qualified more as halupki than petits choux farcis. Or shall I call them porcs dans une couverture? Thank you, Babelfish.

And regarding things stuffed inside other things, one word: turducken.
komos From: komos Date: December 21st, 2005 08:54 pm (UTC) (Link)
I can't recall ever having heard "cabbage" and "scrumptious" being used together. In fact, since I'm having a hard time recalling seeing cabbage used in "fine" cuisine, I'm guessing it's time to go on a crusade of sorts.

What's really odd is that I think of pigs-in-a-blanket as sausage links wrapped in a pancake and served with maple syrup. It's an old Quebecois lumberjack trick.

Ask Klae to explain the Bax-turducken sometime. It's the ultimate farce, and it involves Bacon!
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