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It comes around - A little less than a happy high
komos
komos
It comes around
According to NPR, researchers have identified a "flattening" of the demand for American products in foreign markets. The primary reasons cited were:

1) Increased competition from foreign products; and
2) A distrust of American values and policies abroad.
14 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
From: uruz Date: August 17th, 2005 02:09 pm (UTC) (Link)
"Increased competition from foreign products" can be attributed to all the business we're giving foreign companies.

So, really, it's all our fault.
komos From: komos Date: August 17th, 2005 02:18 pm (UTC) (Link)
It's interesting in contrast to the economist who was on yesterday afternoon talking about the oil production crisis and pointing out that countries that haven't engaged in the same wasteful policies as the US have not shown any tendencies towards innovation except in some very few areas - cell phones, for example. 'Course, the forecast was that petroleum production won't adjust to meet the current demands for 18-24 months, and the US is likely not going to weather the storm near as well as these other nations.
futurenurselady From: futurenurselady Date: August 17th, 2005 03:18 pm (UTC) (Link)
While people in this country have shown tendancies toward innovation in the motor vehicle industry, it hasn't been embraced very much.

Also, in this country there is a lack of innovation in other industries as far as reducing reliance on oil.

Just because we use so much and are aware there is going to be a problem does not make us fonts of innovation and alternate solutions.

Whatever happened to the old ideals of American Ingenuity? We have people with the capacity, people with the imagination, but we lack the drive.

It's interesting to note that anyone over 70 who gets on this topic thinks we will never have another Edison, Ford, or Bell.
komos From: komos Date: August 17th, 2005 03:24 pm (UTC) (Link)

Progress without accountibility

I blame the increasing homogenization of the culture that's been in process since the late 1950s. At that time, we embraced a peculiar societal vision and have been stubbornly clinging to it and the myths that foster it regardless of the consequences.
futurenurselady From: futurenurselady Date: August 17th, 2005 03:30 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Progress without accountibility

A man I know who is 90 grew up before that. He thinks the only way things are going to change is through educating children so they can "cope with living in the world instead of just living in this country."

He's probably the wisest person I know. He says that schools have to start teaching more foreign languages, that now it's not just for culture, but for career.
komos From: komos Date: August 17th, 2005 04:42 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Progress without accountibility

We're more likely to take an increasingly isolationist stance. Lord forbid we expose our young ones to the idea that America is not #1.
sinspired From: sinspired Date: August 17th, 2005 05:23 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Progress without accountibility

I agree. It must be bunnies.
why_style From: why_style Date: August 17th, 2005 03:58 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Progress without accountibility

i think we often forget how young our country is and how we only started figuring out how to deal with the world at large a mere 60 years ago. i don't think we've ever been very good at it, but we've always fallen back on our economic power. it will be interesting to see what changes we make as the global economy continues to spread the wealth or whetehr we'll craqsh and burn as we continue to stubbornly believe in our own superiority. it's the downfall of every great civilization- the complacence of being at the top and a refusal to continue adapting.

i agree with you about homogenization being a drain on our creativity, especially when it comes to culture but i'm not sure how far we've fallen off as far as technological ingenuity is concerned. i think ingenuity may be kind of the problem with our foreign trade. we create new technologies that only we can afford to use, then our ideas get exported and implemented in cheaper and more efficient ways overseas, but our products don't follow because they're too expensive and the foreign markets end up sending their cheaper and more efficient versions back to us. look at automobiles- most US made cars are still in the US- we don't export much, and the asian cars companies take up a bigger share of the market every year. or look at cell phones: we were on the forefront of that technology at first, but we made a lot of mistakes. japan hung back and learned from our mistakes, and while we're trying to replace the deficient parts of our system, they've built a state of the art network that far surpasses ours.
komos From: komos Date: August 17th, 2005 04:41 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Progress without accountibility

I think the US has at least a century of solid international relations under its belt. Granted, the focus of those efforts has not always been consistent, but I'm fairly convinced that Teddy Roosevelt had a pretty good sense of how to make American will known on the world scene. The thing that was novel about the past 60 years was not figuring out how to interact with other nations, but how to interact with other nations as a Superpower. While it appears that we won our idealogical war with the communists, we're now in a state where without adaptation and growth, it's entirely possible that we could be buried under our own weight. The structures we're still using to understand and interact with the world really started becoming obsolete with the fall of the Soviet Union.

Of course, this is all far too much generalization. ^_^
sinspired From: sinspired Date: August 17th, 2005 05:25 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Progress without accountibility

Perhaps we are to follow the Romans.
On the battlefield of commerce, we need to find the strategies that will make us victorious again...
komos From: komos Date: August 17th, 2005 05:50 pm (UTC) (Link)

Full disclosure

I've been fairly convinced of the parallels with the late Roman Empire since the early 90s. 'Course, I've been rather cynical about the American experiment for pretty much as long.
why_style From: why_style Date: August 17th, 2005 07:07 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Full disclosure

hurray cynicism! cynics unite! or don't- it probably doesn't matter anyway.
komos From: komos Date: August 17th, 2005 07:09 pm (UTC) (Link)

Re: Full disclosure

Whatever, man...

;P
sinspired From: sinspired Date: August 17th, 2005 07:36 pm (UTC) (Link)

Cynics unite!

EXACTLY.
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